Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Let’s chat about kids sleeping bags….. Hang tight, this post is HUGE (and we hope very comprehensive!) 

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    When people think about taking kids camping, their biggest concern is almost always how are people going to sleep (and WILL sleep actually happen). And with good reason – it’s hard for kids to do change sometimes…and even more so when they’re suddenly in a sleeping bag instead of a bed.

    Back in 2012, we wrote a post about WHY kid-specific sleeping bags are worth it. Because, yes, we do think they are. We also reviewed a few that we could round up and shared what we thought were the best for different sleeping situations. Be sure to check that out before going on.

    We’ve added a couple more kids and done a ton more nights in sleeping bags since then. Some of the sleeping bags we reviewed are actually not even available in the U.S. anymore (like, sadly, the Deuter ones). There are also quite a few new ones that we think are pretty great and worth checking out. We are also going to do our best to continually keep this post up to date. We know right now is not exactly camping season….but sleeping bags make really great gifts too!

    Finally, you’ll notice that our focus here is on more serious camping. These aren’t go-on-a-sleepover bags that you would use indoors. They’re not meant to be cutsey, but rather keep your kids warm and happy while camping.

    **If you purchase a sleeping bag for your kiddo, thanks so much for clicking through these affiliate links. They don’t cost you a dime and help us out just a tiny bit!**

    Let’s get to it!

    1. Backcountry Quilt Option

    While most of us think of only using sleeping bags for the kids while camping, there are other options. Backcountry quilts are basically down (or synthetic) quilts that are kid-size (or adult if you go that avenue..but we are just talking about kids here!) They are our top choice for backpacking because they are so small and light. BUT, you’ll end up spending more than other sleeping bags.

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    You’ll notice that both of these above (from Enlightened Equipment) can be used flat like a quilt, or the toe box can be zipped like below (perfect as you adjust for different temperatures).

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    With the quilts, you are sleeping directly on your pad. This allows more warmth with less fabric/material. Remember that when you’re in a sleeping bag, the material under you is compressed and really does almost nothing for warmth (which is why sleeping pads are so essential). Kids that are really sensitive to how things feel may not love this, but our kids are usually just in long underwear anyway so they don’t even notice.

    We have used and loved the Protege  (on the left right in the photos above) from Enlightened Equipment. It is the more budget-friendly synthetic option. We also have a Revelation Junior (on the left in the photos above), which is a lot more expensive (because it is treated down), but is very warm and larger.  Enlightened Equipment quilts are made to order, which means they take a little longer to get to you, BUT you can also decide how warm you want your quilt to be! Since we live in the mountains and nights are almost always cold, we opted for the colder settings. Note that the Revelation can be built to a colder rating than the Protege. Our Revelation is a 10 degree quilt and the Enigma a 20 degree quilt.

    The quilts come with straps so you can attach them directly to your pad to avoid rolling off and losing your warmth. They can also be cinched at the toe box and around the head.

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Pros of Backcountry quilts:

    • They are very small and light for backpacking in particular
    • They allow more movement than, for example, a mummy bag
    • Some, like the ones from Enlightened Equipment, have built-in straps that keep kids on their sleeping pads <–this is HUGE!
    • They can be used for more than just sleeping (think more like a throw blanket or used like a pillow)

    Cons of backcountry quilts:

    • They tend to be more expensive than a sleeping bag
    • You are sleeping more directly on your sleeping pad, which has no effect on warmth, but is just something to get used to

    Also definitely check out the review by The Kid Project. They have a great video that shows how these quilts work and how they keep kids on their sleeping pads.

     

    2. Built-In Sleeve Option

    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but the only company that I know that makes a kid sleeping bag with a pad sleeve is Big Agnes. And, truly, that is why they are a huge favorite around here. Sleeping pads are key to keeping warm while camping. When you roll off of them (or spin or nudge or whatever your kids do), you lose a ton of warmth. Big Agnes bags have an integrated sleeve that keeps your bag and your pad attached. So, the only way you are going to be separated from your pad is by completely ditching the whole system.

    Big Agnes just updated their kids’ bags and now have Little Red 15 and Wolverine 15. They’re both synthetic, both have pad sleeves and both keep kids really warm. We also like the “neck pillow” to trap warm air in the bag (see second photo below). They used to have integrated sleeves you could stuff with clothing for a pillow, but did away with those for their kids bags.

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    For most campers camping in colder temperatures, these are perfect. However, they are, obviously, heavier than carrying a down quilt + a pad (like the Enlightened Equipment ones shown above).

     

    3. Small Bags for Little Kids and Length-Adjustable Bags

    For years and years, I have directed people to Kelty Woobie 30 when they were looking for a small bag. It used to be very short, lined with fleece and what we used for the littlest ones. However, two years ago, Kelty ditched the fleece and lengthened their bag by quite a bit. In photo below, the purple/pink one is new and the green/blue one is the old style.

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    When I inquired about the changes, they said they wanted a bag that kids could grow into more. They mentioned that you can throw in some clothing or cinch up the bottom of the bag for the little ones if needed (it’s all about them not having to heat up a ton of air space in their bags). Truthfully, we really miss that small bag, but they do have a point. People don’t want to buy a bag that lasts for a couple years at most.

    Here’s the 3 bags that are the shortest ones we know of available in the U.S. (see note about Deuter bags below for those of you NOT in the U.S.):

    1. Kelty Big Dipper 30 *blue*
    2. Kelty Woobie 30 (the newer, longer version) *pink*
    3. Big Agnes Little Red 15 *red*

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    You’ll notice in photos below that the Big Dipper 30 is the same length as the Woobie when it is zipped to it’s smaller setting. Besides the Deuter bags, this is the only other one that adjusts length. You do have the extra bulk in the Big Dipper 30 (for carrying, etc.), which is a reason to choose the Woobie over the Big Dipper.

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Adjustable Bags

    You’ll see that the Deuter Little Star is THE shortest kids’ bag out there when its zipped smaller. It’s also so ideal because the bottom can zip out and lengthen, which means you get a ton more use with it. But, sorry, U.S. readers – the Deuter sleeping bags are no longer available here (but ARE for those of you reading in Europe!) The Deuter bags (both the Little Star and Starlight EXP) are more of a summer weight, but really work for most conditions people are camping in regularly.

    Here’s the three adjustable bags and how they compare:

    1. Deuter Starlight EXP
    2. Deuter Little Star
    3. Kelty Big Dipper 30

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    How small the Deuter Little Star really is (she is 2 years old):

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

     

    4. Sleeping Bags for Kids that Don’t Like Sleeping Bags

    Kelty just came out with their Tru.Comfort Line (rated to 30 or 45 degrees). The great thing about them is the 2-layer blanket system inside the oversized mummy that lets you adjust your comfort as the night cools off. I have an adult one too and it is SUPER comfortable. Fits up to 5′ tall (or long??)

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

     

    Sooooo….which one do I want?

    • If you’re backpacking and can afford it, go with the Enlightened Equipment Backcountry Quilts
    • If your kids roll a lot, go with a Big Agnes Bag
    • If you need more of a summer weight and want the sleeping bag to last longer as they grow, go with the Kelty Big Dipper
    • If you’re in Europe and won’t be in super cold temperatures, go with the Deuter bags
    • If you’re kids can’t stand being limited by a sleeping bag, go with the Kelty Tru.Comfort or a backcountry quilt

    And since I know I like comparison charts, here’s one with the options available for kids that I have used and can speak on. You can even download this or open it bigger (and let me know if this works for you – this is the first time I have used a chart like this!)

     

    Price
    Best For
    Temperature Rating
    Max Length
    Weight
    Adjustable?
    Integrated Pad Sleeve?
    Available in other colors?
    Big Agnes Little Red$70Small kids, cold temperatures, kids that roll off their pad15 degrees4'5"1 lb. 13 oz.noyesno
    Big Agnes Wolverine $90Slightly larger kids, cold temperatures, kids that roll of their pads15 degrees5'2 lb. 6 oz.noyesno
    Kelty Woobie$65Economical, preference for 2 zippers, smaller kids30 degrees4'2 lb. 4 oz.nonoyes
    Kelty Big Dipper 30$80Want to be able to adjust for a growing kid30 degrees5'3 lb. 1 oz.yesnoyes
    Kelty Tru.Comfort $80Kids who don't like the contraints of normal sleeping bags20 degrees5'3 lb. 4 oz..nonoyes
    Deuter Little Star *not currently available in the U.S.*~$60Infants/Toddlers and as they grow. Summer camping.40 degrees4'~1 lb. 9 oz. (or 750 g)yesnoyes
    Deuter Starlight EXP *not currently available in the U.S.*~$90Summer camping for kids slightly bigger40 degrees5'6"~3 lb 5 oz. (or 1500 g)yesnoyes
    Backcountry Quilts$110-$250Backpacking10-40 degrees (you can choose)N/aLess than 1 lb.yesstrapsyes



    Pin it:

    Kids Sleeping Bag Round-Up

    © 2016, Tales of a Mountain Mama. All rights reserved. Republication, in part or entirety, requires a link back to this original post and permission from the author.

      Comments

      1. My mom JUST purchased our youngest a bag for Christmas so… I wish this was posted a week ago 😉 I really like the idea of the pad sleeve in the Big Agnes and might just have to return the one we purchased (from LLBean) to look into this (or the Kelty Try.Comfort!)…. THANK YOU. Loved this post.

      2. This is a good rundown of the options, we are at a transition point where our daughter is too tall for her MEC kid’s bag, but small enough that an adult’s bag will be too heavy. I am getting her a lightish mummy bag and sewing her a quilt as an overbag. That way she won’t need to carry the full setup in summer when it won’t be -30°

      Speak Your Mind

      *